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about the rest of us? and there is a lot bween ron paul and dennis kucinich. what about the rest of us? my view is that i do not want to be involved in endless wars anymore thanhey do, but i do insist that we win wars we cannot afford to lose. now, the left and some of our libertarian friends believe we cannot afford this war and they e ready to leave. what happens if we leave and does it really matter? all of you are smart. you can aner that question probably better than i can. i can tell you what i think and that is probably why you came. if we lose i afghanistan, whatever that may be, it will matter. and what is losing? i think losing would be allowing the taliban to come back in power in portions or all of the country. i have one simple thought -- the taliban running anything is not a good idea. particularly i you happen to be a young woman and you believe in religious freedom and tolerance. but what does it really matter? their places -- there are places on the planet where women are treated horribly and we do not have one troop. so this is not just about righting wrongs that may
this together on such short notice. for those of us who are jews, , some jewish we know what it is like when people have attacked us verbally, attacked us physically and others remained silent. it tcjhhn>'n, americaw"# in 2010 without the response of the religious community. we speak out because we know that hate crimes and hate speech are not mere acts of disreputableiv! assaults or arsons or derivative their attacks on the pillars of the public and the guarantors of our freedom. betrayalo >> what an honor and privilege is for me having stood on the mall for years ago under similar circumstances where we were talking about liberty and justice for all. the statement that we have worked together collectively reads the sleeve. religious leaders denounced anti- muslim bigotry, call for america's respect for tradition a religious liberty. as religious leaders in this great country we have come together in our nation's capital to denounce categorically the derision, misinformation, and outright bigotry being directed against america's muslim community. we bear a sacred responsibility to honor ame
police procedures and what not that would be used in any crime scene were used in connection with this event. mike does mention the excellent work that the fbi did piecing together the puzzle that led to the identification of the terrorists within a short period of time. however, the preventive side of it definitely became more of a military exercise. even in that regard, the fbi and department of justice had central roles to play to develop a strategy that could be implemented to look at our borders. >> there had been a number of terrorist attacks. there were the embassies in east africa. the first world trade center attack. you could even go back to the u.s. marine barracks bombing in beirut in 1983. in every case with the united states government did principally was to send out the fbi to try to find people you could identify as perpetrators so that they could be captured and prosecuted. what you hear from all of the discussion and is very important for people to focus on is that this was a different case. this was not about going out to find people who did it to punish th
religion within america is part of an exclusive club. this exploitation of the truth that is used for political purposes since this is now an election year, and the fact is, most americans are the easiest targets. they are an easy punching bag. we do not have the reach. we do not have a lobby. we do not have a p r infrastructure. the other side obviously has the microphone. my mentor always said something that is very telling for us as muslims as well as for americans and people. the world is not divided into muslims, christians, and jews. the world is divided into stupid people and intelligent people. >> on that note, who wants to be the first u.s. question? [laughter] raise your hand and we will have the gentleman with the microphone, for. >> we've discussed this in the past. while we know that the great majority of muslims embrace and endorse the founding principles of the united states and want to be good americans, unfortunately there are people who do not. they profess to be acting in the name of islam. one of the difficulties it seems to me is that there's no central author
security. u.s. troops pulled out last summer. iraqi forces had moved into the lead with considerable skill and commitment to their fellow citizens. even as they continue to suffer terrorist attacks, security infancies have been near the lowest on record since the war began. iraqi forces had taken the fight to al qaeda. this year sell iraq called incredible elections i drew a strong turnout. a caretaker administration is in place. tonight i encourage the leaders to move forward with a sense of urgency in coming to form a government that is just representative and accountable to the iraqi people. there should be no doubt that the people will have a strong partner in the united states. going forward, and the transitional force of u.s. troops will remain in iraq with a different mission. they will support iraqi troops in targeted counter-terrorism missions and protecting our civilians. a consistent with our agreement with the government come on u.s. troops will leave by the end of next year as our military draws down, are dedicated civilians are moving into the lead to support iraq as a result
political settlement. what makes us think that we can make some progress now? that is really only very recently that all the necessary elements of the campaign have come together. despite the fact that there have been western forces there since 2001, it is only rarely now that the necessary number of forces are deployed in afghanistan, as general petraeus has recently been making clear. one of our announcements had been a 40% increase in the development going to afghanistan. we have an economic protests that that is bought out by the afghans themselves. all these things have come together in recent times. the single most difficult problem we have faced in international affairs, but i think now we have the finest military minds, a good military plan, the necessary quantities of development and the experience of provincial reconstruction, and motivated key ministers in afghanistan, to have the best chance for success that it is possible to put together. i believe is right to maintain an effort to succeed, because i think the consequences of abandoning that effort now would be extremely s
and put natural gas to work for us. it is good for everything. it is good for the economy, employment. the atmosphere, the planet. if we do not do it, we will all be dead. in there are plenty of reasons to do it. [laughter] [applause] >> this next question will be a little sticky for you, because you are partners with -- on this project, the summer on project. you are partners with this southern company. to go we're trying to coopt the energy. -- >> we are trying to coop the energy. the seven companies in the southeast wind and solar power, the least productive part of the country. they have to bring it in from a long way away. that means we have to have a transmission system. we have to have national standards so we can go across state lines. it needs to be implemented right now and not 10 years from now. we have to use the same kind of laws that we didn' -- we have to get it done and get it done fast. i am perfectly happy to have plenty of windmills and solar panels on my land and transmission lines. i care about my country and my friends and my grandchildren more than i do about al
the vice-president for foreign and defense policy studies. thanks a for joining us today. we are very proud to have senator lindsey graham here today. he will give a short talk this morning or this afternoon which will be followed by a session of "q&a" with the audience. after that, we will do a short and sweet roundtable, something we have not done in the past. no set piece presentations. i am pleased that we are able to have senator graham ought back here. he has really given it back one of the most interesting and well received talks here in many years last time he spoke. he has a very illustrious resume which is online at for you to read and its full form. he served for 6.5 years as an active duty air force lawyer. after leaving the air force in 1989, he joined the south carolina air national guard where he served until his election to the house of representatives in 1994. he serves as the south carolina state in the house of representatives since 2003. he was called to active duty in the first gulf war. he continues to serve in the reserves. he recently returned from reserve duty in af
for bringing us all together to talk about these very important issues. i have been asked to talk about racial profiling in the context of emigrants. there have been many waves of american history in which there have been anti-democrat laws and policies, but that the federal and state and city level. starting about five years ago, there has been a more recent wave, and states and cities across the country started proposing and enacting laws that were essentially designed to make life very hard for emigrants and to try to drive them out. in the last five years the state legislators have enacted reject proposed thousands of anti- immigrant laws. -- who have proposed thousands of anti-democrat loss. one of those mentioned here was the pennsylvania law, which is a law that prohibited undocumented immigrants from granting and restricted employment as well. there have been similar laws all across the country in places like farmers branch, texas. riverside, new jersey. in arizona, which is a very active state in this regard, is not the first and will not be the last. several years ago arizona passed
. >> there was a column this week called, "a superpower super broke," talking about the u.s. it is estimated that there are about two hundred al-qaeda agents. >> how many? >> 200-300. >> i thought you said two hundred million-300 million. >> know, we are spending about $1 million apiece. this is the tip of the iceberg. this is a conceptual question. is there any thinking about approaches that are not so expensive that may be more affordable? >> let me turn your question a little bit on its head to say that this is actually the more affordable way of going in comparison to many of our other assistance programs, this is still not that large. compared to what we have to deal with in a country that is broken in the case of an iraq or en afghanistan, this is a very small amount. i would underscore, as the president and secretary have, that this is a matter for the international community. there are a lot of countries to have recognized this challenge and shown their commitment with their pocketbooks. it is a difficult time, obviously for us. you could argue that our british friends are on a very
funding for autism treatment in 12 years; student loan assistance for u.s. troops called to active duty; support for troops who come home with ptsd; more help and more contracts for pennsylvania's small businesses. [applause] he has been doing the work. in washington, you know, they make the distinction between show horses and work horses. and joe is a work horse. [applause] he's been working, not talking. [applause] and this is somebody who's been pragmatic. he will work with democrats, he'll work with republicans, he'll work with independents. he's willing to work with anybody who's interested in actually getting the job done, and that's the kind of person you want representing you in washington. that's who joe sestak is. [applause] that's why you need to work for him to make him your next senator. [applause] on the other side, we've got a candidate who was in washington for years, ran a special interest group whose main function has been to pull the republican party to the right -- even farther to the right. [laughter] i guess you could say they've done a good job -- [laughter] -- at
, a look at the u.s. foster care system. daniel heimpel joins us. this is "washington journal." [captioning performed by national captioning institute] [captions copyright national cable satellite corp. 2010] host: good morning, and welcome to "washington journal" for wednesday, september 27, 2010. president obama travels to new york for the u.n. general assembly. he will talk health care reform at a back yard reception in virginia s and meet with insurance commissioners and this evening, a democratic fund- raiser. the house returns to washington for a few days of business and the senate continues work. yesterday it did not move for the defense authorization bill and overturning "don't ask, don't tell." a ban on gays openly serving in the military. top story today, a new book by bob woodward about inside the white house. but with the president and his top military advisers and recounts a tough decision on whether to build up true spirit that is our topic this morning. you can give us a call and way and -- we are also on line. and you can find us on twitter. the top story and "the washington
in place at 45 airports nationwide, and we intend to use recovery act funds to purchase even more machines and deploy them in the coming months. . . let me say, again, we are now through a secure flight, we have accomplished the cutover, so we are measuring the manifest against the watch list, and we're doing so for all domestic carriers. we will also be working with international carriers and hope to complete their cutover by the end of the year. this will lead to more thorough and timely watch list checks, and less of the miss identifications that sometimes cause unnecessary inconvenience for travelers and undue media attention. finally, we have begun screening 100% of the air cargo of domestic flights on passenger planes, as required by 9/11 act. this is a goal that we have been working towards. i know alpa has been working closely with the tsa on these requirements. we will continue to work with you to make sure that this program is as effective as possible and its implementation continues to go smoothly. so as i said at the beginning of my remarks, you remain one of the most vital par
if used properly. such mechanisms include common- sense measures including digital tagging, community flagging, and a host of very important tools that could be used. my time is up. i will finish on this. we also need to weigh in on the ways that people, young children are moved around. last summer, this past summer, i convened a group of flight attendants led by american airlines which has a great program that really needs to be replicated worldwide so that the flight attendants and crews will recognize the person who is in traffic -- being trafficked, across borders or states, and take action. not in a vigilante type of white. alert the pilots so that when this individual gets off, the right law enforcement asset, can be waiting there at the gate. there were instances after instances told where it just did not look right. and the flight attendants and watched what was going on, got into a conversation, perhaps when the young lady was going to the restroom and told the pilot who told law-enforcement. and those young ladies were rescued. we need to close up every means of moving victi
that were bestowed on us through our constitution and with the grace of almighty god. we're endowed by our creator with certain inalienable rights. apparently the president left out the creator, it's understand -- understandable, when you rely as heavily on teleprompters as our president does, it's understandable that sometimes you read past things. and certainly the person who fills in his teleprompter with the information would not have left that important part of the declaration of independence out, we're endowed by our creator, because if it were otherwise, if we were endowed by the government with inalienable right, then the government could take them away any time they wished.1 any time they wished. but when you go back to the founding of this country to the time when those people gathered together and gave us the foundation of what we've grown from and grown into this fantastic republic, the greatest coubt country in the history of the world, as tony blair recently said and as another member of parliament saying this week, this is an extraordinary country, like no other in history.
enables us to represent our interests throughout the world is a principle we should uphold. can i put it to you that you have mentioned this in your answer before. is it true, and i take this from your written response to our questions, that you are referring to the viewing the scoring methodology to ensure this work is fully captured inconsistent with the guidelines for scoring. that means you're looking at things that have in the past been paid for by the budget. tacom>> there is a quite a propn that is categorized as overseas development. in the last year 137 billion pounds. >> a you will have to wait for the results of the comprehensive spending because you are trying to anticipate and trying to anticipate this. we will have to wait for those things. that spending can be provided for as a very different budget. the important thing is it is compliant. as we look at the country by 2013, we are all strongly agreeing on the gross national and come. it's important to recognize what contributes to that. that is oversees development spending. takeov>> spending will be used o fund things
" reporter andrew zajac. and a discussion on the u.s. labor market with economist j. bradford delong. this is "washington journal." [captioning performed by national captioning institute] [captions copyright national cable satellite corp. 2010] caller: caller: caller: caller: caller: host: general petraeus, secretary clayton -- glenn beck, among others, agreed that the dove out of reach center should not burn at the koran on the anniversary of the 9/11 terror attacks. now we want your opinion whether you see it as a free-speech issue or not. you can see the numbers on the screen this morning. for the first 45 minutes we will be talking about this and going through the newspapers. you can also send us a tweak to -- tweet, tweet certification.com -- twitter.com/c-span-wj. here are a couple of articles about this. it has become headlines everywhere. u.s. embassies brace for karan burning protests. this is from the associated press. governor andate's u.s. embassies around the world preparing. from "the washington examiner" newspaper here in washington -- again, that is in "the washington
to the middle east. >> direct negotiations among the u.s., israel, and the palestinian authority in pursuit of a final agreement, sediment, and just peace of two states living side by side -- settlement. george mitchell will answer a few questions, but we still have meetings going on. he will have to return upstairs to rejoin the negotiations. >> good afternoon, ladies and gentlemen. the parties have just concluded the first round of trilateral talks. the meeting lasted about an hour and a half. it began with a plenary session involving the full u.s., israeli, and palestinian delegations on the eighth floor of the state department, and then broke to a smaller meeting in the secretary of state's personal office involving prime minister netanyahu, president abbas, secretary clinton, and myself. prime minister netanyahu and president abbas then went into a separate meeting for a direct discussion. that meeting is still going on right now. in the trilateral meeting, there was a long and productive discussion on a range of issues. president abbas and prime minister netanyahu expressed their inte
-- they should have enough capital to cover all of their losses. host: ok, thank you. republican line. calling us from los angeles, at an early hour. caller: i wanted to comment. i don't think the government should help any firm, and there are no firms that are too large to fail. there are perfect bankruptcy laws that are printed on the books. we just have to let the strongest firms survive and those of that for some reason cannot maintain their costs, you have to let them go. we cannot interfere with our market system. host: thank you for your call. i mentioned about candidates. some candidates picking up on this theme. here is just one example. cathy rodgers, washington's fifth congressional district. on her website, she has a series of pledges should see is putting forward. no. 5, reversed the wall street bailout. saying she had voted against the $700 billion tarp the bill and now our goal should be to make sure something like tarp never happens again. no company is too big to fail. the only thing to big to fail as america itself. one candidate picking up on this theme of bailouts. let us go n
a recommendation -- a decision by the president and whether that would be useful at the time. >> he has not traveled much. that is because he has a full- time job. >> do you think anything has been changed with what the people in afghanistan are asking? second, china's rise of the military in the indian ocean -- >> first of all, i think the elections took place despite the fact that the taliban are trying to disrupt them. there are lower levels of violence then there were during the presidential elections last year. at the end of the day, there was still a lot of effort put in by the taliban to intimidate voters. it undoubtedly had an impact on the turnout. a higher percentage of women in this election than in the presidential election. certainly there were a lot of complaints about the election that will have to be adjudicated, but i think having held the elections, the afghans were in the lead in terms of security for the elections. i think it is an important landmark that they have had these elections and that we can now move forward and tabulate the results of the election. >> milit
for afghanistan. whenever you do a strategic plan, used her with a list of planning assumptions. if any of the internet to be wrong -- when every do a strategic plan, you start out with a list of planning assumptions. if any of them turn out to be wrong, then you have a problem. they looked at the afghan presidential election and started rethinking whether or not we had a credible partner that we could work with, by, and threw in afghanistan. if you look at the way we americans look at counterinsurgency, we are a lot from the british and different experiences of the 20th-century. -- the british and french experiences of the 20th-century. the british and northern -- the british in northern ireland, they thought they were in their own turf. by the same token, the french in algeria, the french considered algeria part of metropolitan france. it was non-negotiable. when the conflict began, algeria was a part of france. that was not from the perspective of the fln. that informed the way they thought about the conflict. you kind of assume that your interests will line up with the host governme
this proposal for business tax credit. the numbers -- if you want to send us a message electronically, twitter is c- span-wj and you can also send us an e-mail and that address is journal c-span.org. and we will give you the telephone numbers again. we were having some technical problems. there they are. so, we want to get your thoughts on this. at the numbers, again -- our first call comes from columbus, ohio. gerry on our line for independents. caller: a beautiful day. the reason america tank in 1937 -- i am in my eighties, i am an old man. to have a realize, pump give water you have to prime the pump and you have to spend money and the u.s. chamber of commerce is not spending the money. they are working with the other party. it is just ridiculous. there is no reason why this should not be done. and i wish you guys would get on the fact that where is the money going to come from to spend a $10 trillion that the american society of civil engineers estimates it would take over the next five years to bring the infrastructure up to be-. still waiting for c-span to cover that. where do all these
to use that power. you ally have to be authoritarian in that croor. most jurors are coming into your courtroom having watched things on television or in the movies that is still not the real thing. it's important to take them step by step in the process, especially in important cases. the other thing i tell jurors is i refer to hamlet. even in a capital case there may be moment when something happened that it's funny. and it happened to the moussaoui case. with the human enterprise trial. remember in hamlet, there is comic relief. it doesn't mean the whole play isn't a tragedy. if this means this is a human enterprise where people laugh. you try to set the tone for the jurors. they really understand what we in the courtroom are going to be hearing together. and so i think even if the president thinks the outcome is a done deal, it isn't if we set the right tone in the courtroom. >> i would say if you were appointed defense lawyer in the case you would do everything you can to get that in front of the jury buzz of the fruche dangerousness of the defendant. rob and i were talking about
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